Nemeton Segomâros
segomaros-column

Invocations

Here are a few invocations, in Gaulish and English, to enable you to call on the Dêuoi. To Cernunnos: Gediyins gwuyûmi Eti woxtlus wegyûmi Carnonon wediûmi Tigernon Caiti Dîclâwetos Cingi Dêwos Arelayetyo Marwon Eti detyo ulânon Yo dîclâwetis Cingon Dêwobo, anson gediyins Dêwobo beretyo. Prayers I pour out And words I weave Carnonos I invoke The Lord of the Wood The Opener of the Way The God Who Guides the Dead And gives prosperity That…
Nemeton Segomâros
segomaros-column

Digression 4 – Crow’s Bluff Reflections

Driving west over the Whitehair Bridge, across the Saint John’s River, there is an abrupt transition from restaurants and marinas to deep forest. The trees are suddenly dense, the ground marshy, dotted with pools of water. Down there, a few feet north of the bridge, on the west bank, where the forest is deepest, there was once a town called Crow’s Bluff. It lasted from the 1870s to the 1930s. They finally took out the…
Kemet Today
kemet

The Music Belongs

Once, long ago, in the Black Land, lived a man named Ptahhotep. Ptahhotep had three fine sons, one of whom he hoped would succeed him in his position of Overseer of the Singers of the God in the temple of Ptah in Mennefer, city of the White Wall. Ptahhotep’s family had served the great god as overseers for tens of generations. There had never been a time when Ptah’s temple music had not been part…
Noēseis
Banner-EButler

The Nature of the Gods (III): The First Intelligible Triad (2)

Having discussed in the previous part of this essay those aspects of the God which are entirely prior to Being, we now join the God in proceeding to be. The division between that which is beyond being (the epekeina tês ousias that is the locus of the Good in Plato’s Republic) and Being Itself lies within each God, in the form of the division between the God’s existence (hyparxis) and Her activity (energeia). In the…
Fleet-Footed
Mosaico 01

A Philosophy of Movement

Today is the fourth day of the fourth month of the year, a combination that doesn’t go unnoticed for this particular mercurial devotee. It’s also my fourth piece on this site, so in light of that and as a tribute to the son of Maia, I’ve decided to write an article not about a fundamental topic that needs to be addressed or some obscure aspect of polytheism, but rather something more personal. It’s an expression…
Nemeton Segomâros
segomaros-column

The Basic Ritual Outline

This is an outline for a possible reconstructed Gaulish ritual system, adapted to modern circumstances. The basic sources for this are Indo-European ritual, as reconstructed by Ceisiwr Serith and others, Greco-Roman sacrificial custom, modern Druid ritual, and the rituals of related cultures like the Germanic and Baltic peoples. In addition, it is influenced by what can be learned from the archaeological record. It is designed for one-person or small-group indoor rituals, and so is missing…
The Web of Blessings
Spider_Web

Hreda and Eostre, The Goddesses That Bless This Time of Year

Blessed Hredmonath to all! Hredmonath was the pagan Anglo-Saxon name for the month of March according to the Venerable Bede in his *De Temporum Ratione*. According to Bede, the Anglo-Saxons sacrificed to their goddess Hreda during this time. Interestingly, the Christian holiday Easter ends up falling during the month of Hredmonath, when to the ancient Anglo-Saxons, it was the month of April (Eosturmonath) that was named for their goddess Eostre. The only recorded information we…
Spring and Stone

Politics and Polytheism

You can have politics, and you can have polytheism, and you can have them both together; but, it is folly to mistake politics as polytheism. The term “politics”, to be very brief, has to do with the day-to-day governance of human activities and human-to-human relationships. The term “polytheism” has to do with the religious regard of many gods as individuals—which is more of the realm of deity-and-human relationships. Politics and polytheism are two different categories,…
Nemeton Segomâros
segomaros-column

The Nemeton – The Sanctuary

Nemeton was the Gaulish term for a sacred place, a sanctuary.1 The term is probably derived from: Nemos: Heaven, Sky2, though even the earliest Nemetâ have pits and other elements suggestive of Underworld connections. Elements of a Nemeton: Nemetâ were built over the course of many centuries, and so have diverse designs. One of the more common designs is the Belgic type of sanctuary, typified by such Nemetâ as Roquepertuse, Gournay, and Ribemont.3 Some of…
Ørgrandr Lokean
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Loki’s “Roads”

It isn’t uncommon in polytheistic traditions for deities to possess many different aspects or epithets to describe different parts of their nature. Each individual deity can almost be thought of as possessing an entire pantheon within themselves, and in many traditions different aspects of that god or goddess is called upon for different things. In Santería, these different aspects of certain Orishas are called “caminos” or “roads”, and while all roads are understood as still…
Nemeton Segomâros
segomaros-column

Talamonodêwoi

I. Talamonodêwoi: This term is again my own coinage, from “talamon”, meaning “ground, earth, soil”, and “dêwos”, meaning “deity, spirit”. The Talamonodêwoi, then, are the “Earth Deities”, another word for the Land Spirits. There are few actual examples attested, though there must have been more. A couple examples we do have are listed below: A. Dusioi: Destructive forest spirits rather similar to the Greco-Roman satyrs, the Dusioi caused damage to orchards and crops, and came…
Spring and Stone

Seeing the Trees for the Forest

Sometimes, even among us polytheists, there is still a tendency to reduce to a few that which numbers the stars. This tendency is an internal artifact of ingrained patterns, an unconscious bad habit from generations of living with the insistence that there are no deities, or that that there are only one or two deities. We know that there are more than none, one, or two. We know there are several. But sometimes, because of…
Fleet-Footed
Mosaico 01

The dead are gods, too

To the modern eye, one of the most controversial features of ancient Roman polytheism – if not the most controversial – is the imperial cult. For one, because in an age of individual freedom many of us are uncomfortable with authority figures, let alone deified ones, and especially when they’re not particularly sane or their moral compass differs from ours. But also because of our modern attitude towards divinity, in that we tend to see…
Nemeton Segomâros
segomaros-column

Dêwâs Matres

The Matres are an important type of female local or tribal deity found across the Gaulish-speaking world. Their iconography is distinct, and so they must be treated as different from the other types of local Goddess. This iconography suggests that they had connections to fertility, plenty, and fate. Some modern Germanic Heathens treat them as related to the Germanic Idesa, deified female ancestors, and I think there may be something to this, though it doesn’t…
Noēseis
Banner-EButler

The Nature of the Gods (II): The First Intelligible Triad

If unique individuation1 is the principle of divinity, then the science of divinity, if there is to be such a science, will emerge from considering the fundamental characteristics of such a unit. We would tend today to call such a science ‘theology’, but the ancient Platonists were ambivalent, at best, about using this term in this fashion. ‘Theology’ for them always meant primarily what it had for Plato when he, apparently, coined the term: the…